Safe Use

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol

A majority of Americans regularly take two prescription medicines per day, while 20 percent take five or more prescriptions per day.1  This isn’t unusual, but multiple medicines can interact in your body in ways that are difficult to predict.

Be safe by following these steps:

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol

Keep a list of all medicines and vitamins/supplements you’re taking and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Include details about the brand name or generic name of the drugs, strengths, quantities and how often you take them. Note the dates you started and any changes. If you’ve stopped taking a medicine, include that, as well.

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol

Tell your doctor or pharmacist about problems you’ve had with medicines, including rashes, indigestion, dizziness, loss of appetite or unusual physical or emotional reactions.

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol

Ask if and how your medicine will interact with anything else you take or eat.

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol

Read the instructions on the medicine. Know what, when and how much to take each day.

Want More Safety Tips?

Dangers of Mixing Drugs And Alcohol
  • Don’t mix alcohol and medicine without your doctor’s OK.
  • Call your doctor right away if you have problems.
  • Promptly refill your prescriptions.
  • Use one pharmacy for all of your prescriptions.

Mixing Alcohol and Drugs

Since each human body processes drugs and alcohol differently, it’s impossible to know the exact effects combining substances can have. But know this – taking different kinds of drugs together, or mixing alcohol and drugs can be incredibly dangerous.

dangers-graphic

“Potentiation” can result from mixing alcohol with drugs, or taking two or more drugs at once.
Think of potentiation as 1+1 being greater than 2. It’s the compound effect you’ll feel from using one substance added with another, and it can be very difficult to predict.2, 3

What can happen?
The amounts consumed, the potency of the drug, and how an individual body processes each substanceall factor into the equation, and the specific response to most drug combinations remains unstudied. So nothing is certain…or safe.